Item Categories

Search For Items

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Currently in bloom at OTA, a peloric phalaenopsis

Old Pueblo bandolier bag with silver


From one of our northern New Mexico pueblos, this is a hide bag, essentially a bandolier bag, fringed and decorated with a large silver concho and a domed silver button. The bag is painted/stained all over with a red mineral pigment. Made to use rather than to sell, this was long used. The same two bumpy areas on the lower edge, are visible on the back of the bag as well. There is dusty stuff inside, possibly corn meal.

The bag measures approximately 11″ tall including the fringe x 6″ wide. The strap is about 40″ long above the bag. The front of the bag has a large stamped silver concho and the flap has a high domed silver button. The loose hide string at the bottom of the bag might have been used as a fastener at some point but the flap stays closed. A unique piece.


$425.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Nez Perce beaded bag


Nez Perce beaded bag

 

A beautifully made Native American Indian beaded bag. I believe this is Nez Perce or Shoshone but someone else thought it might be Cree. Anyway, it’s a lovely small beaded hide bag. This well made little bag is beaded front and back with a fully beaded floral design on the front and a scattered floral design on the back. Circa 1930s, brain tanned hide, could be elk. The bag measures 4 5/8″ tall closed x 3 5/8″ wide. The bag is in excellent old condition with no notable issues.

$275.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Plains beaded hatband with flags


Plains beaded hatband with flags

A detailed Native American made hatband. The hatband is loom woven beadwork on cotton or something similar, glass beads including tiny whitehearts which were popular trade beads in North America. From the Plains area and features stylized American flags and comes together at the back in four connected fringes. Circa 1920s.

There is a separation between two of the fringes but that is not damage just a space usage decision. There is some bead loss in the band near the top of one flag and a few gaps in the weaving where a bead was skipped. Each fringe has loose threads that could be anchored but the fringes are not losing beads at present. It measures approximately 22″ inside circumference x 1 3/8″ wide. Fringe is about 3″ long.


$235.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Vintage Navajo double saddle blanket, FULLER


Vintage Navajo double saddle blanket, “FULLER”

 

By definition, this saddle blanket or rug, is a figural weaving with text, “FULLER” is woven in across the bottom. Many pieces with text, names, businesses, etc., were custom made by Navajo weavers. Handspun and handwoven wools,measures 62″ long x 30″ wide.

$650.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Miniature Pima basket with butterflies


Miniature Pima basket with butterflies

 

A lovely little basket made by Pima artist Stephanie Hendricks (Hendrix). Stephanie is known for making fine small baskets from the traditional basket materials used by Tohono O’odham and ‎Akimel O’Odham basket makers (Papago and Pima), yucca and devil’s claw. The basket has two butterflies woven in. The basket is about 3/4″ tall x 1 1/4″ wide. Stephanie’s name is on a small adhesive tag inside the basket.

$125.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Navajo silver letter opener


Navajo silver letter opener

A very heavy, layered silver letter opener. Verbal only but this was said to have been custom made for Tobe Turpen in Gallup. This is not cast, the jeweler used four layers of silver sheet to form the handle and then shaped the blade from the center two of the layers. Then stamped the handle on both sides. The whole piece measures 8 7/8″ long, the blade is 4 7/8″ long, the handle is 1/2″ wide and 5/16″ across the layers.

$275


Have a question? Inquire Here


Caribou antler cribbage board


Caribou antler cribbage board

An unusual thing, this is a cribbage board made of a caribou antler. Hand finished, with an incised figural decoration, and signed on the back. I was told that this was found on a beach in the Bering Straight. I didn’t quite believe that until I looked closer and, yes, many of the holes are still full of sand. Based on the signature, the piece was probably made on Mary’s Igloo, an Inuit village originally named Kauwerak. In the early 1900s, non-Natives valled the village “Mary’s Igloo,” after an Inupiat woman named Mary, who welcomed visitors, trappers, miners and others, into her home. The village was nearly empty by the mid-1950s. The antler is signed “D.O. Komok” and “Mary’s Igloo.” The board measures 11 3/4″ x 9.”

Note that the board has 20 holes in each long row, rather than 30 in each row on standard boards. So, players have to go around three times rather than twice. No pegs and a little sand would need to be dug out of the holes. Otherwise, the board is in apparently excellent condition.

$325


Have a question? Inquire Here


Early Hopi Heheya Kachina

An old Hopi flat or “cradle” kachina. With the corn cob on his forehead, I believe this is Heheya. Definitely made for use rather than for sale, he is carved of cottonwood and painted with mineral pigments. The fluff on his head is fur on hide, probably rabbit. He was made with one non-traditional element that must have just fulfilled the need at that moment. The wrap around his neck is foam rubber with a black fabric covering.

He measures 10″ tall by 5 3/4″ ear to ear and his head is about 2 1/4″ deep. The katsina is in very good old condition. The fabric wrap is holey and there are bits of paint missing.

$275.00


Have a question? Inquire Here


Join Us On Facebook Follow on Twitter Subscribe to RSS Feed